Events : Experttalk: Thoughts on Free Data

Experttalk: Thoughts on Free Data

August 24 2022

In a world where we have long since become at home on the Internet and share our lives, questions about authorship and licensing rights have arisen not only since the invention of NFTs. The non-profit organization Creative Commons has been working since 2001 for the simple and concrete handling of works on the internet by publishing license agreements in which authors can determine the rights of use to their works such as images, texts, music pieces, videos, etc. This can open up new freedoms for artists, public and educational institutions, as well as interested private individuals. But what is the future of authorship? What do Creative Common licenses mean for art? How do artists use Open Data? Are there new formats of licensing rights? How to create freely accessible works that are actually used regarding production and reception? What is the anarchist and anti-capitalist potential of Open Data?

The event will take place on Zoom in English and is free of charge. Save your spot here: https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZcvcuyspz0oG9fEta5af_he8q_sE6hGm6g9


Quelle: Toy Story Meme via troll.me Toystory

Constant Dullaart is a Dutch artist who explores, among other things, internet culture, authorship, the intersection between tech and art communities, and the performativity of art. In long-term performances he questions the art market and its excesses on social media and tries to examine the materiality and conditions of the internet more closely. In doing so, he always proceeds with critical sensitivity, humor and a certain poetry.

Martin Zeilinger is Senior Lecturer of Computer Art and Technology at Abertay University in Dundee, Scotland, and works scientifically on topics such as digital art, appropriation-based art practices, theories of cultural and intellectual property. He is currently working on two monographs and writes for magazines such as Spike Magazine.

Gabi Schulte-Lünzum and Ulrike Fladerer have both worked on the Städel Museum Frankfurt's Digital Collection and its publication. The mammoth project has so far made over 22,000 artworks freely available with a Creative Commons CC BY-SA 4.0 license, allowing parts of the collection to be made accessible to a broad public. This means that the works can now be reproduced and shared, as well as used and edited for any purpose.


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